Peer Recovery Coach

PEERS

 

As the recovery movement unfolds towards a chronic care approach, clinical treatment and recovery support services must be much more integrated. Peer coaching is surfacing as the service that can be easily and effectively integrated throughout the continuum of care: from interventions, detox, inpatient, post treatment and beyond.

Peer Recovery Support Services are:
• Services to help individuals and families initiate, stabilize, and sustain recovery
• Non-professional and non- clinical
• Provide links to professional treatment and indigenous communities of support

They are not:
• Professional addiction treatment services
• Mutual- aid support
• Peer-Operated Recovery Community Center

Some Peer Service Roles

Peer Recovery Coaching
• Relapse Prevention/Wellness Recovery Support
• Behavioral Health Peer Navigator
• Self-Directed Care
• Peer-Operated Recovery Community Center

Peer Recovery Support Services Encompass Four Types of Social Support
• Emotional
• Informational
• Instrumental
• Affiliational

Examples of Peer Recovery Support Services
• Peer Recovery Coaching
• Peer-facilitated groups
• Resource connectors
• Peer-operated recovery community centers

Peer Recovery Coach
• Personal guide and mentor for individuals seeking to achieve or sustain long-term recovery from addiction, regardless of pathway to recovery
• Connector to instrumental recovery supportive resources, including housing, employment, and other professional and nonprofessional services
• Liaison to formal and informal community supports, resources, and recovery-supporting activities

Peer Coaches Assess Recovery Capital
• Builds on individual’s strengths and capacities
• Responsibility for recovery shared by individual, family, and community
• Identification and location of recovery-supportive resources
• Challenges to address high severity addiction and low recovery capital
• Strategies to address hierarchy of needs

PRC Training
This training will provide participants with a comprehensive overview of the purpose, tasks, and role of a Recovery Coach. The training will provide participants with information, tools, and resources needed to provide Recovery Coach services. It also will emphasize the skills needed to link people in recovery to needed supports within their communities and provide the ability to train others in their community to promote recovery. Eligible participants are defined as “individuals interested in promoting recovery by removing barriers and obstacles to recovery and serving as a personal guide and mentor for people seeking or already in recovery.”

A total of 30 hours of continuing education units are available for those who successfully complete the training.

At the end of this training participants will be able to:
• Describe the roles and functions of a Recovery Coach
• List the components, core values, and guiding principles of recovery
• Build skills to enhance relationships
• Describe stages of change and their applications
• Address ethical issues
• Practice newly acquired skills

Download This Handout

Download Fact Sheet

Download PEERS Flyer

Contact me if you have questions or would like to sign up yourself or peers for the Recovery Coach Training as well as the certification process.

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Kimberly Miller
Coordinator for Project PEERS
Mental Health American of Indiana
317-638-3501 x 1520 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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